A blog about songwriting and about the songwriter Luigi Cappel

Posts tagged ‘fan base’

About Songness and music upload sites

I’m always interested in checking out new sites where you can post your music and when I heard about Songness, I think from The Musicians Cooler podcast, I thought I’d sign up. Just a quick digresson. Dave Jackson over at the Musician’s Cooler has some awesome podcasts and if you have an iPod or other way of listening to MP3’s are strongly recommend you subscribe. He has great guests and excellent information if you are tryin to grow your business. He also has an excellent eBook which I have purchased myself called Get Your Band out of the Basement and Keep Them out of the Asylum and if you are putting a band together or wanting to keep it together, this is a great investment. I got the Audiobook version which I listened to in the car.

I posted my new song onto Songness called Watch Me Daddy a couple of weeks ago, so far not a single listen. On the Homepage it says that each song will be rated by up to 200 registered fans. You get an audience report for free and loads more. 

The concept sounds really good, (the concept doesn’t sound at all, but I guess this shows that even subconsciously I’m an auditory person) but I suspect that it is still at the prototype stage, so hopefully things will happen. There are still sections of the site that have word fillers, you know the latin words that developers use to show where the words are going to go. 

One of the key things if you want to post music on these kinds of site, is to listen and comment to others. Generally, just like MySpace, the more you contribute, the more you get back. The challenge is where to spend your energy. An example on MySpace is Em-J Taylor, who writes on her page that she spent 2 years promoting herself on the web. With over half a million plays, you would have to think she has been reasonably successful.

I have music on lots of sites and will share some information about them in future blogs. You never know where an opportunity will come from and each site tends to have it’s loyal followers.

One thing that I did recently was to create a spreadsheet so that I can see all the sites that I have music on, what songs or videos I have on each site and when I last visited. That way I can monitor what I’m doing and also check out the number of listens so that I can see the effectiveness of the work.

One thing I am big on is sincerity. There are companies who will send out ‘friend requests’ representing that they are you and helping you build a huge ‘fan base’. I am against this and like Em-J, I do my own friend requests and when someone invites me to be their ‘friend’ I will listen to their tracks and leave a comment. I would rather have 500 fans who would come to my gigs than a million who really don’t know who I am and don’t care. They are just numbers. 

Listens do count, if they are real. It’s possible to create false listens, but again, what’s the point, are you trying to look good under false pretences or are you trying to build a fan base so you can go on tour and have people come who already know who you are and like your music. 

Just a comment here, these are my opinions and you may believe otherwise. That’s great and you are welcome to argue your case here by leaving your own comments. There is no absolute right in this industry.

I’ve had a few people send me ‘friend requests’ at MySpace after reading my blog and I welcome that. Please do come and listen to me on MySpace, or maybe even give Songness a try. You can find me there, only one song at this stage, because I didn’t want to put any more effort in at this stage untilI see if it is justified.

So that’s me for now, bookmark or RSS this page and come back some time:)

Do you know who your fans are part 2.

Following on from yesterday, I wanted to cover a few more ideas, because first of all it is about the song, but someone has to hear it and if you know who is going to like your music, then you can influence the chance that they will find it.

So here are some more questions to ponder:

What hobbies do they spend money on?

Where do they live? Why not try to get gigs near the right demographic? If you play death metal, it might be in working class area (crass generalisation I know that many death metal fans are well educated but generalisations have some degree of fact). If you play country, then a rural tour might be on for you. You should have an idea of where your fans live. Or at least where a higher percentage do.

What do they drink? If they have a favourite tipple, that might help. For example if they are students burning the candle at both ends, you could look at getting Red Bull to sponsor your gig. They could help promote it and offer deals. If they are farming people for country music, Speights might be the go. When you ask for a lot of money, for example to sponsor a tour, you have to get in early so they can budget for it if they are keen, but if you only want some product and promotion for a gig, it can be pretty easy. The thing to do is tell them what’s in it for them and ask. It’s often that simple. Just remember that can offer something to them, you just have to figure out what that is. At he very least its visibility and if you have done your homework, you will know what it is.

What radio stations do they listen to? There are many ways of getting attention from radio stations if you use some smarts, even if you are unsigned and they are not playing your music. I might have a look at this topic in the future in more depth.

What TV shows do they watch? TV is a bit harder to get to, but if they are young and watch the music channels. In New Zealand it might be MTV, Juice TV, Alt TV, you will be surprised at how easy it is to get some support from them. Wherever you are, there are similar local stations who want to know about local acts. Check out what exposure other bands or artists similar to you are getting. Ask the band or artist, ask the station, don’t forget they have to have shows and videos. If it’s summer, have a beach party and invite Juice TV to send a crew over. You are a songwriter, use some of your creativity to find novel ways to make things happen. Write a song about the beach party that you are inviting them to and send it to them. Have them in the song.

I had a sales rep working for me a few years ago. He was from London and had that Cockney patois and wanted to make things happen. Within a couple of weeks he had his own show on our local MTV. All he had to do is ask.

What magazines and newspapers do they read? I’ve talked about PR before and will again in the future. If you know the types of magazines your fans read then you know where to send your Press Releases.

Where do they go on holiday? A couple of years ago I was in Raglan, (you can hear the story on my Music Forte page, the song is called Raglan Rain) and there was a guy who I recognised from New Zealand Idol running around the small town putting mini posters on all the shop windows that would let him, promoting a gig he had that night in one of the cafe/bars. Unfortunately I can’t remember his or his bands name, I guess I’m not the right demographic. Obviously he had decided that the surfing and artsy type of people that hang out in this famous surfing area where his target market and was now doing everything he could to get lots of people to his gig.

The great thing about what he was doing was

  • He had indeintified where his target market could be fiound on a Saturday night
  • He visited all the shops (probably around 50), got most of them to put his mini posters in the window and spent time talking to the locals.
  • His venue was the only one with live music at night so once everyone knew it was on, he was pretty much guaranteed a crowd.

I drove past that night and the bar was full of people having a great time. They all paid a door charge and the band would have not only had a great night with people who liked their music, they also made a profit on their gig.

Do you know who your fans are? Part One

There is a market for every kind of music and it is important to know who your market is, whether as a songwriter or performer. You need to know who they are so you can plan your approach as to how to target them.

What is their age group, are they tweens, teenagers, young adults, old rockers? Are they mostly male or female? What is their lifestyle? Are they still at home with their parents or starting their own families, or have their families already flown the coop?

What artists do they listen to? One of the important things on many sites where you can upload your music is who do you sound like, who influenced you. These tags are there for people to find music similar to the artists they like. Make sure you are genuine because if you are like the artists they listen to, you will build up your fan base more quickly.

How do they buy music? Do they buy on the net? at iTunes? Do they buy CD’s in mainstream music stores? In Department Stores? In specialist stores like Marbecks or Real Groovy?

How often do they buy music? Do they buy music themselves or do othes buy it for them as gifts?

How do they discover music they like? Do they hear it on the radio? iTunes? Podcasts? Do they find them by reading reviews in magazines, online, from video’s, recommended by magazines?

Where would they go to listen to music? An art gallery? pub? Concert Hall? Cafe?

Where do they buy their clothes? Often the music playing in certain shops might influence them. If there is a cafe that people go to who like your music, give the cafe a copy of your CD and ask them to play it for you.

Have a think about who your fans are or could be and given the ideas above, how could you influence the situation so that people who like your music can find you. There will be more on this in the next few days.

Knowing who your fans are can help in many ways. It should influence what you write, the style, the lyrics (are they accessible to your demographic), how you market your music, where you sell your music and much more.

There is a target for every kind of music form Christian Death Metal to jazz fusion and opera. Obviously the place and way to target eac genre will be very different. Understanding these things means that instead of taking a scatergun approach, you can aim straight for your target market, winning more fans to buy your music, attend your gigs and tell their friends about you.

By the way, I’d really like this blog to be interactive. You don’t have to agree with me. I would love to make this a discussion, not just me rambling on………………………………….

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