A blog about songwriting and about the songwriter Luigi Cappel

Posts tagged ‘Music’

Sieffe La Trobe – RIP

I’ve had a rather surreal day.  Over the last week I have been working flat out to finish my new eBook, nothing at all to do with music. It’s all about using location based services to help when you’re buying a house. Anyway I had just finished the draft and contracted someone to create a book cover design for me and went to check my email.

In the email was a message from Titirangi Folk Music Club, saying that Sieffe La Trobe had passed away and sharing the funeral details. The email was sent last week, but I was reading this an hour and a half after the funeral had started! I sat at my desk trying to take it in and couldn’t. The email said that there would be a remembrance and music afterwards at a church in Henderson. I told my daughter and she said GO and next thing you know, I’m on my way to Henderson with my guitar.

How do you process this? I arrived and sat in on some great music with fiddles, dulcimers, guitars, mandolin and more, with jigs, reels, folk songs and contemporary music and left it to my fingers to decide which ones to join in or not.

I saw a few old faces but its been so long since I was in that scene that I didn’t remember many of the names. Many I hadn’t seen for a couple of decades.

I don’t know how long I’ve known Sieffe. Going by this story on NZ Folkies, it was before 1984 because I remember visiting him in Fort Street when he was just setting up Fat Sparrow Studios. I still have a frame he made me somewhere that I used to swap photos out in every few days.

RolandG-707

RolandG-707

I remember the little shade of envy when he got himself a Roland Guitar synthesizer. I’m not positive, but I think it was the same as this one. He complained about the delay, but said that it really made you lift your game. I remember thinking I could live with that problem.

I remember, like him riding around on motorbikes with a guitar strapped to my back, folk festivals, clubs, good times.

Last time I saw Sieffe, he was jamming at the Coatsville market. It’s probably been 2-3 years since we jammed together.

I finished this song a while ago and it now has a rap bridge. Seems like its haunting me. A wake up call. Daylight saving started on Sunday. I hibernate in winter, don’t like playing in cold bars. I’ve been too busy working, not playing my guitars. Time to fix that:)

So while I didn’t write this one for you Sieffe, next time I’ll perform it in your honor.

Another Man Has Gone

V1

On the streets of Avondale

Wearing the tread off my shoes

Don’t you talk to me man

Can’t you see I’ve got the blues

My heart is breaking

Cancer called again

Another man is gone.

Chorus

Another man has gone

Life will never be the same

Another man has gone

How do we go on

V2

A brother comes along the road

So drunk he can hardly stand

He looks me up and down and nods

Then he shakes my hand

Life runs in cycles

And they have to end

Another man has gone

Bridge (rap)

I’ve been walking down these streets so long that I can’t feel my feet

But I can’t stop because that’s getting real, accepting the deal

The ache that I’m feeling

I’m reeling one minute you’re there then you’re gone and I can’t stop

Because that’s getting real, accepting the deal

V3

Now I’m on a back street

Man is glaring at me

His eyes are throwing daggers

Maybe he thinks that I’m a D

But I’m just a sad man

Walking misery

Another man has gone

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Its Music Night at #SMCAKL

It’s music night at Social Media Club Auckland and I was thinking about that and a radio interview I have coming up with Stephen Horton AKA Rezinator on The Highway of Dreams on the 1st of July.

In the shower, where I start my day’s planning I was thinking of all the things I needed today and started thinking about what I wanted to do. That’s play more music, write and record more songs and start gigging again. I’ve been so busy working this last year that my music has played second fiddle and this blog has been sitting in the back room where the guys tune up before getting on stage.

So here we go, another blog and hopefully the start of many more and maybe you’all will come back for more.

Gibson Factory

Yep, that’s me:)

I have to work out which tracks to share on the radio show and am wishing that I had done some more recording because since I recorded the songs which you can hear on my Reverbnation page, they have matured a lot, with rewrites and practice. One of the things that often happens as a songwriter who doesn’t perform much any more is that as soon as you have finished your latest song, you move onto the next one.

I’ve been stuck on one of my latest songs until last weekend when I had a bit of a blow out. I can’t share the recording with you yet, because it is still rough, but I can tell about it. It’s a rock, reggae, blues number with some rap in the bridge (yes I have genre fatigue) and I’m going to need some help with it.

My friend Charly Nice will hopefully add some of his awesome sax to the song as he did on You Oughta Run. I’ll need some help with the rap too. I know what I want it to sound like, I’ve got the phrasing, but not the voice for it. What I’d really like to do is make a music video of it, take you down those mean streets, but of course that means funding from somewhere.

I guess its taken me a long time to write it because it is based on the day my father in law died after his second bout with cancer. It chronicles a walk I made around the streets of Avondale, his final resting place. It’s probably taken that long for me to deal with it.

If you follow the lyrics you might get a gist of the story, but it will take a good recording and video to really share the story so you can feel it. Like walking past a rough pub and seeing a guy covered in ink, drunk as a skunk, with a beer bottle in his hand and a scowl in his face, who makes you feel like you should cross the road quick-smart and then extends his hand in a warm brotherly shake. That was like Auckland weather, all emotions in a couple of minutes.  If you’ve been in a similar situation with someone you cared about and then walked through a neighbourhood made up of some awesome and some quite scary people on a black day, you might relate.

Another Man Has Gone

V1

On the streets of Avondale

Wearing the tread off my shoes

Don’t you talk to me man

Can’t you see I’ve got the blues

My heart is breaking

Cancer called again

Another man is gone.

Chorus

Another man has gone

Life will never be the same

Another man has gone

How do we go on

V2

A brother comes along the road

So drunk he can hardly stand

He looks me up and down and nods

Then he shakes my hand

Life runs in cycles

And they have to end

Another man has gone

Bridge (rap)

I’ve been walking down these streets so long that I can’t feel my feet

But I can’t stop because that’s getting real, accepting the deal

The ache that I’m feeling

I’m reeling one minute you’re there then you’re gone and I can’t stop

Because that’s getting real, accepting the deal

V3

Now I’m on a back street

Man is glaring at me

His eyes are throwing daggers

Maybe he thinks that I’m a D

But I’m just a sad man

Walking misery

Another man has gone

So the writing is done. now comes arrangement and practice, then getting a team together to help record it.

So there’s my latest song-writing blog. If you come back I will too, OK?

Musical Vegetables

I haven’t posted for a while and I will do soon, but in the meantime, this will entertain you. This is quite amazing and seems to be becoming a bit of a trend.

Do you know who your fans are? Part One

There is a market for every kind of music and it is important to know who your market is, whether as a songwriter or performer. You need to know who they are so you can plan your approach as to how to target them.

What is their age group, are they tweens, teenagers, young adults, old rockers? Are they mostly male or female? What is their lifestyle? Are they still at home with their parents or starting their own families, or have their families already flown the coop?

What artists do they listen to? One of the important things on many sites where you can upload your music is who do you sound like, who influenced you. These tags are there for people to find music similar to the artists they like. Make sure you are genuine because if you are like the artists they listen to, you will build up your fan base more quickly.

How do they buy music? Do they buy on the net? at iTunes? Do they buy CD’s in mainstream music stores? In Department Stores? In specialist stores like Marbecks or Real Groovy?

How often do they buy music? Do they buy music themselves or do othes buy it for them as gifts?

How do they discover music they like? Do they hear it on the radio? iTunes? Podcasts? Do they find them by reading reviews in magazines, online, from video’s, recommended by magazines?

Where would they go to listen to music? An art gallery? pub? Concert Hall? Cafe?

Where do they buy their clothes? Often the music playing in certain shops might influence them. If there is a cafe that people go to who like your music, give the cafe a copy of your CD and ask them to play it for you.

Have a think about who your fans are or could be and given the ideas above, how could you influence the situation so that people who like your music can find you. There will be more on this in the next few days.

Knowing who your fans are can help in many ways. It should influence what you write, the style, the lyrics (are they accessible to your demographic), how you market your music, where you sell your music and much more.

There is a target for every kind of music form Christian Death Metal to jazz fusion and opera. Obviously the place and way to target eac genre will be very different. Understanding these things means that instead of taking a scatergun approach, you can aim straight for your target market, winning more fans to buy your music, attend your gigs and tell their friends about you.

By the way, I’d really like this blog to be interactive. You don’t have to agree with me. I would love to make this a discussion, not just me rambling on………………………………….

Live music banned in Bangalore

At first when I read this on Muziboo, a site I have just been invited to join and posted a couple of songs on, I thought this was just some situation that was being exaggerated, I mean how can such a large city ban live music.

When I think of India, I think of Sitar and Tabla, religious music and those awesome rythms ad I can’t think of anything better than going out to a Bangalore Bar and listening toa live band. But no, it’s for real as I read in The Times of India.

Live bands and even karaoke have been banned by the police. It seems that music leads to drinking and drinking leads to crime. The entertainment and hospitality industry are suffering big time, but as a songwriter and performer, my heart goes out to the performers who’s livelihood is at stake and the people who enjoy music to relax and unwind, to be happy and share good times with their friends and family.

Shame on you, Bangalore Police. This is patently wrong and ther world is watching you. I suppose you would be happiest if you put the whole city under house arrest. Sure there will be people at dance parties who get over enthusiastic and there may even be the odd fight, but for the most part, people who are enjoying music are doing just that, being happy. Give them a break. if you have to make them employ extra security at places where there is risk, but you can’t stop the music!

Music Critics and getting the media to your gig

The media has power, they are mavens and have huge control over what people listen to and what they think they should like. Many artists, like politician, don’t like critics at all, they don’t like what they write, but in the end I think the addage that any media is good media, applies much of the time.

They say I see it is that if the media writes about you, they are giving you attention and hopefuly someone will dig deeper, look for you on MySpace, or go to one of your gigs. If they make the effort, then reward them with recognition themselves. Show an interest in them.

When I first started chasing the media, it was to get attention for my sport at the time which was landyachting. We had a team going to Nevada for the America’s Cup of Landyachting and our sport was not great for spectators because our courses were often very long, as in 30 or more km. We needed sponsorship and both to attract sponsors and to get them coverage, we had to get the media to write stories and show us on TV etc. The main way I achieved that (and we won the cup) was by ringing the media and asking for their help and advice. I got it, they got stories and we got coverage.

So how do you get the media to your gig? First try and find media that might be interested in your genre, the best place to start is to listen to them on radio or read their stories. When you find people that you think would like your offerings, send them a CD. It could be demo’s or a commercial production. Send them your bio and invite them to your gig. It’s worth ringing them first to tell them what you are sending them, including the invitation and ask them for the best way to get it to them. That sets up a personal relationship so it isn’t just an impersonal envelope that looks like something you have sent to everyone.

Ask them to come and introduce themselves to you if they do turn up at the gig and make some time to talk to them. It wouldn’t hurt to make a fuss of them and build them up and the gig either, maybe in the middle of a set, shout out a welcome to them and get the audience to give them a friendly clap. The media is a networking environment and I have no doubt that they will appreciate the recognition.

Having recognised them, spoken with them at the gig, understood what they like, dislike or didn’t understand, you will be developing a realtionship with them and it is much more likely that they will give you a good review. After all, you are friends now, right?

Remember that people write about a particular topic because they like and are interested in it. If they are a music critic (and I use that term loosely, but if they are writing about a gig, they are offering their personal critique) they are doing it because they like music. If they come to your gig, it is because they want to be entertained and to like your offering, it’s outside of their work hours, i.e. they are gving up their personal space. They probably also want to be seen in the right places and are looking for other artists or interesting people. If you rewadr them for their effort, they will probably do the same for you and you may end up with a long term ally that can help you up those little steps to local stardom.

Tips on being a support act

The first thing to consider is that you are a support act and one of the key things you are there for is to support the main act. First of all, as I mentioned in my last blog, your music should be in the same vein as the main act.

You are there to warm up the crowd as well as to make a name for yourself. If you are the last act before the main or you are the only act, it is a great idea to be able to build the audience up so that they are really getting into it and having enjoyed your act, will be in the zone to enjoy the feature. An excellent example of this was the band Blue King Brown who I mentioned in my blog about the Santana ‘Live Your Light’ tour. They were amazing and everyone was fizzing when Carlos got onto the stage. Blue King Brown. They built the crowd up and were a great act on their own, but didn’t detract in anyway from Carlos’ magic performance.

Start your set with something really good, as a support act you don’t have much time, so you need to build attention as quickly as possible so they will keep listening, you can’t start up with a quiet ballad and build up to a climax from a quiet opening number. People will start talking and they will treat you as background music. Once you have their attention you can start working them up to a grand finish which will have them wanting to hear more and remembering who you are.

When you finish and have the crowd on a high looking forward to the main act, build the act up, tell them they are in for something special that they will really enjoy. Praise the upcoming act to build the expectation and to show the lead act that you value the opportunity they gave you.

When you finish your set, get yourself and your gear off the stage as quickly as you can so that there isn’t too much silence between acts and the crowd holds on to their warm anticipation.

Use these simple ideas, and assuming you had the right material for the type of audience, you should find yourself being offered more gigs, whether as supporting act or as the main deal. You might even get opportunities to tour with an act.

If you found this blog useful, please tell other people, send them a link and subscribe yourself for future blogs. If you want to hear my songs or are looking for a new song for yourself or your artist, please drop me a line. If you want to add to this, please leave a comment, it’s about sharing. If you would like to hear some of my songs, check them out on my MySpace Page.

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